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Category Archives: Politics

Ancient Paths: The 10 Commandments

Ancient Paths: The 10 Commandments

Over 3,300 years ago, the Israelite prophet Moses was called to the presence of God on Mount Sinai. It was there that God spoke the words we now refer to as “The Ten Commandments”.

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Charlton Heston and Cecil B. DeMille (1956)

In May of 1964, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, in partnership with Hollywood movie director Cecil B. DeMille, gifted the state of Arizona with a monument depicting the Ten Commandments. It was placed in Wesley Bolin Plaza, just east of the Arizona State Capitol. In 2003, the memorial became the target of an attempt by the American Civil Liberties Union to have it removed. They argued that it violated the concept of separation of church and state. They didn’t succeed, but the controversy surrounding the inclusion of something so religious on government grounds continues.

Why the secular world disapproves of the Ten Commandments.

Duh. Though three out of four North Americans still believe in God, there is significant doubt that the God of the Jews is the one true God. There is also doubt about a) the historicity of the Sinai event, b) the credibility of the Bible that contains the Sinai story, and c) the relevance of the Old Testament of the Bible to the New Testament practice of Christians.

Perhaps more to the point: Americans, in general, don’t like others telling them what to do. Particularly ancient religious guys like Moses. We don’t have the Code of Hammurabi, the Analects of Confucius or the Koran in Wesley Bolin Plaza … so why the Ten Commandments? Though I disagree with the assessment that the Decalogue monument is some sort of violation of anybody’s liberties, it is a bit odd to have them there.

But, in the church? Should they be prominent there?

Why believers promote the Ten Commandments

The Order of Eagles and DeMille felt like the U.S. was slipping away from its Biblical moorings. They were right, and the slippage continues. They wanted to see Biblical content remain central to American life. This reality, too, is fading.

Even in our churches.

9781595478603In our church, the Ten Commandments are an ancient path that is a critical part of our teaching and practice. Well, it’s a big part of what we call our Catechism, which is taught to our young teens in our Confirmation programs. We continue to believe that the Ten Commandments are part of scriptural revelation from God, and we read the Exodus and Deuteronomy passages when they come up in the cycle of public readings.

But many Christians who have practiced their faith for years are unable to list these ten commandments for memory. Many haven’t read them for themselves in years. It’s not enough that the Ten Commandments be conveniently memorialized in our Catechisms. They are an ancient path that needs to be hiked regularly for the good of our souls. How might we do that?

More tomorrow … from the pen of Martin Luther.

– EO

 

 

 

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12/4: Staying Sharp

12/4: Staying Sharp

First Monday of Advent: Amos 1,2

Christians long for the second coming of Jesus, “the day of the Lord”. It will be a time of great joy for those who believe. But it will also be a terrifying day of judgment for those who do not. Jesus said, concerning that day or that hour, no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father” (Mark 13:2). He calls his followers to wait and be ready for His coming. But for many, it will be a surprise, and they will be caught living godless lives — which will result in judgment. The blatantly irreligious will be found wanting, yes … but also many who believe they’re a part of God’s inner circle. 

amos-600mapIn Amos 1 and 2, the prophet foretells the judgments of eight nations. Six of them are “secular,” and two are the divided kingdoms of the people of God, Israel and Judah. In sum, they provide a litany of specific offenses that will lead to condemnation from God. Wartime tortures (1:3,13), human trafficking (1:6,9), denigrating other foreign leaders (2:1), forsaking peace accords (1:9), “forsaking pity” and staying perpetually hostile (1:11) … all for the sake of imperialistic land-grabs (1:13). All of these charges have to do with international politics.

But then, to the (supposedly) godly nations of Judah and Israel, God brings punishments for different reasons. Here are three:

“They have rejected the law of the Lord, and not kept His statutes. Their lies have led them astray” (2:4).  God had uniquely revealed Himself to the Jewish people. The words of that revelation through the law of Moses was their special gift, and also their distinctive measure. They had let this inheritance slip, and were letting the lies of their day pull them from obedience to mandates of their God. I can’t help but think that Christians today are following this same path. 

“They sell the righteous for silver, and the needy for a pair of sandals” (2:6). The people of God had grown materialistic. They cared more about what they could purchase for themselves than the welfare of their neighbors, especially their poor ones. They spent more on shoes than on the poor. I can’t help but think that Christians today are following this same path.

You made the Nazirites drink wine, and commanded the prophets, saying, ‘You shall not prophesy'” (2:12). God ordained spiritual disciplines, which helped keep the peoples sharp and attentive before God, were downplayed, and even forbidden. Had they become passe? No longer appropriate for their then-contemporary world? Too legalistic for their enlightened minds? Had they grown tired of all that talk of sin, righteousness and judgement? For whatever reason, their faith-lives had gone unpracticed and unfueled. I can’t help but think that Christians today are following this same path.

Amos’ Advent challenge to the people of God: Yes, the world is full of unspeakable evils. It’s easy to say, “Hey, I’m no terrorist.”  But our plumb line is different. So, we need to let our love of God and His Word keep us from falling for the lies of our culture! We need to quit living for the promotion of our bottom lines, and be generous! We need to embrace our disciplines (e.g., be appropriately religious), and amplify Biblical truths! All the more, as we eagerly await the Lord “roaring from Zion” on that final day. May we not then be found to have lost our edge, and unconsciously drifted from God.

Stay sharp! “Prepare your minds for action, and being sober-minded, set your hope fully on the grace that will be brought to you at the revelation of Jesus Christ. As obedient children, do not be conformed to the passions of your former ignorance, but as He Who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct” (1 Pet. 1:12-14).

– EO

 

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Any Chance We Might Grow Up?

Withholding love from another person is the supreme act of childishness. Forbearing, proactive love … that’s the trait of a mature adult. We need God for that.

———————

This from one of Christianity’s most popular texts, 1 Corinthians 13: When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I gave up childish ways” (13:11). What are these childish ways that Paul is talking about? In the context of this chapter, it’s quite simple. It is childish to withhold love.

“If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal.” If I lay out articulate Facebook rants, and can share quotes from my favorite talking heads, but am snarky, antagonistic, profane or dismissive of others, I’m just noise.

“And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.” If I, in my self-perceived brilliance, believe in my convictions can change the world around me, but cannot be kind when I present them, I am nothing.

“If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing.” Even if I “walk my talk”, and am involved in all kinds of service projects that support my causes, but my heart and attitude toward others who disagree with me remains angry and contentious, the gain of my good works is nullified.

So, what is this love that Paul speaks of? It is, primarily, staying active in hard relationships. “Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends.”

Kind. Love suffocates in non-relationship. It breathes through activity. Being kind is love. Just choosing to be neutral — to not be unkind — isn’t love.

Patient. Bearing. Enduring. Never-ending. Love assumes things will get difficult, and stays in the game anyway. To bail out on a relationship when it doesn’t go your way, that’s childish.

Arrogant. Rude. Irritable. Resentful. If these words describe you, then you’re acting like a child.

If you are so bent toward someone that you actually rejoice when things don’t go their way … this is the height of immaturity.

Children always think they should be given a second chance, but still carry grudges against others, and withhold them their kindness. Children want the benefit of the doubt for themselves, but they choose to meditate on the negatives of others, thus exchanging joy for bitterness. Children want people to believe in them, but they magnify and believe the worst in others. Children want others to see it their way, but give up hope for a better tomorrow that comes, as promised by God, through reconciliation and sticking together.

Children think they know. Then they become judge and jury over you. You will be found guilty. Love is gone. Existence becomes null and void.

Childish politics conceives contentious gridlock. Childish religion creates suicide bombers.Childish academes squash thoughts from a different point of view. Childish employees trash talk their bosses behind their backs. Childish church members leave their congregation when something happens they don’t like. Childish marriages produce divorces. Childish friends feel they’ve been so wronged that they have to withhold their ongoing care, affection and kindness.

God, through His Word, calls us to put away these childish behaviors. He provides the means to do so. But these days few are listening to God, and even fewer are availing themselves to the divine empowerment that makes change possible. Even those who find God interesting remain unwilling to hear His call to us to exercise the self-sacrificing kind of love that could change the world.

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Any chance we might grow up? Our chance is contingent on our love for God … which will enable our love for our neighbor. Without God? No chance.

If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it” (Matthew 16:24-25).

– EO

 

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A Needed Insight For Our Time

Beating up others – in violent riots, or violent social media posts, all because others believe differently than you … well, this is the height of social immaturity. May those who call themselves by the name of Christ be grown-ups, so the world can know what a grown-up looks like, and where to turn to find them.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – –

I saw a disturbing video, and could hardly believe it. A group of “Antifa” protesters beating up on a “Say No to Hate” rally. Beneath the Facebook post of the video were a number of comments about the rightness and (mostly) wrongness of these kinds of actions.

 

It dawned on me: As a populace, we are very weak and immature. Which is why we fight so much.

This according to the Apostle Paul. One of Paul’s major themes in the New Testament is how we should handle our deepest convictions. Paul acknowledges that we all have them, and they are often different.

Example: “For us there is one God, the Father, from whom are all things and for whom we exist, and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things and through whom we exist. However, not all possess this knowledge (1 Cor. 8:6-7).

The Bible says that knowledge about God and the spiritual world is God-given. Not all have it, therefore not all believe the basics. So, how do we handle having this knowledge when other’s don’t?

“We know that ‘all of us possess knowledge.’ This ‘knowledge’ puffs up, but love builds up. If anyone imagines that he knows something, he does not yet know as he ought to know” (1 Cor. 8:1-3). ‘All things are lawful,’ but not all things are helpful. ‘All things are lawful,’ but not all things build up. Let no one seek his own good, but the good of his neighbor” (1 Cor. 10:23).

We can have what we think is a better grip on reality, the truer facts of the situation, and a better idea about the next best course of actions. But this isn’t helpful just because it’s “right”. If we’re “puffed up”, we’re not helpful, and do our neighbor no good. Instead…

“I have made myself a servant to all, that I might win more of them … to those outside the law I became as one outside the law that I might win those outside the law. To the weak I became weak, that I might win the weak. I have become all things to all people, that by all means I might save some. I do it all for the sake of the gospel, that I may share with them in its blessings” (1 Cor. 9:19-23).

When it comes to the believer’s relationship with the world, it’s not about loving how right we think we are, then insisting that the world become like us. Rather, we become like them in order to love them, honor them, serve them. And hopefully during that interaction God gives them ears to hear and eyes to see … and are saved.

 

“As for the one who is weak, welcome him, but not to quarrel over opinions. One person believes [one thing] while the weak person [another].  Let not the one despise the one … and let not the one … pass judgment on the [other]. Who are you to pass judgment on the servant of another? It is before his own master that he stands or falls … Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind  … For we will all stand before the judgment seat of God … each of us will give an account of himself to God” (sel. fr. Rom. 14). 

Welcome them. Be fully convinced, that’s fine … but don’t quarrel over opinions. Just don’t! And certainly don’t despise or pass judgment.

“So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God. Give no offense to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God, just as I try to please everyone in everything I do, not seeking my own advantage, but that of many, that they may be saved” (1 Cor. 10:23-33).

Give no offense! Try to please everyone. Because the issue isn’t who’s right. The issue is what will helps promote the truth, and salvation.

CONCLUSION: When we have sharp disagreements, mature people have the capacity to love their neighbor rather than insist on their own correctness. Mature people keep the bigger picture in view, not the heat of the momentary issue. Mature people humble themselves by crawling into the existence of the other — doing all they can to understand their hearts and minds — so that love will prevail over our contention.

* EO

 

 

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Christianity and Patriotism

Christianity and Patriotism

The 4th of July is coming. In the life of the church, there is often tension associated with the holiday.

In the U.S.A., most in our congregations are citizens (though there are also immigrants, aliens and sojourners among us). Most of these are proud of their country. In many churches, the expression of that national pride has become a part of Sunday worship celebrations, and even special programming centered around our pride in, love for, and allegiance to the U.S.A.

Some cry foul. Others are ready to tar-and-feather you if you don’t enter in.

Recently, John Piper shared his thoughts about Christianity and Patriotism in an online podcast. I’d like to share my thoughts in relation to Piper’s in an attempt to set an appropriate course for churches.*

Piper points out that, in many churches, our Fourth of July celebrations seem “uninformed, unshaped by the radical nature of the gospel, and out of proportion to the relationship between America and the kingdom of Christ.” This is our big question: What is that relationship?

Piper: “We are pilgrims, sojourners, refugees, exiles in all of those. Our first identity is with the King of the universe, not any country or nationality or political party or governmental regime. America is emphatically not our primary home or primary identity. That should be spoken.”

So far, so good. Unfortunately, for many church goers, it is their primary identity.  The Word of God does need to be spoken clearly into these idolatrous hearts, and a call to absolute allegiance to God needs to made. Still, being citizens of the U.S.A. is part of our identity. (I appreciate Piper using the the words “first” and “primary” above.)

Where I would veer away from Piper’s thinking is in his choosing to make such a vigorous demarcation between allegiance to God and allegiance to the state. “We swear absolute allegiance to him and to no one and nothing else. All other commitments are relativized … All of those authorities are subordinate and secondary to the authority of Christ and, therefore, all submission is qualified.” Piper draws a bold line between Christ as Lord and all other lordships.

ref-luthertours.jpgBut this approach and this rhetoric fails to give weight to the Biblical truth that the Kingdoms of this world are a divinely ordained extension of the rule and reign of God. For kingship belongs to the Lordand he rules over the nations” (Ps. 22:28). “The kingdom of the world has become the kingdom of our Lord and of his Christ” (Rev. 11:15). And, the extension of God’s rule on the planet is delivered through human governments. For there is no authority except from God, and those that exist have been instituted by God … he is God’s servant for your good … he is the servant of God … the authorities are ministers of God … Pay to all what is owed to them … respect to whom respect is owed, honor to whom honor is owed” (Rom. 13:1-7).

In short we have the tendency to pit God’s rule against the rule of governments — when the reality is that the state is an extension of God’s rule. This governance can and should be respected and honored by the church.

(I think it’s obvious, but I’ll say it anyway — this is true not just for the U.S.A., but for any believer in any country. This can be especially difficult when a government is plagued by dysfunction and injustice. Nonetheless, it is truth that calls all Christians to appropriate, faith-filled, disciple-like action.)

So, if I might take the liberty of reshaping Piper’s previous paragraph: “We swear absolute allegiance to him, and our allegiance to our country is an extension of our acknowledgement of His rule. All other commitments are contained in this over-arching commitment to God … All of those authorities, though subordinate, needn’t be considered “secondary” to the authority of Christ, but part of it. Therefore, all submission needn’t be qualified, except in instances when disobedience to Christ is mandated.

As to the question of patriotism in worship, I agree with Piper when he says “any pledge of allegiance –  like the one to the American flag – does not belong in a worship service.” But I disagree with his assessment that, when these emphases on country take place, “what is being highlighted and foregrounded is an earthly allegiance.” Again, this doesn’t need to be the case, and this hard line doesn’t need to be drawn. God’s rule through the Spirit/Word/gospel and His rule through governments can be celebrated together. But it’s God’s rule. And because it’s God we celebrate, the emblem of a particular state should not be the icon for our worship.

I had the privilege of serving as a pastor in The Netherlands. Needless to say, we didn’t celebrate the Fourth of July! More to the point, we didn’t celebrate specific national governances, not even that of the Dutch. You see, it was a strikingly international community. To celebrate one sister’s nation would make us feel obliged us to celebrate the nation of every brother and sister in the church. (Churches in the Southwest, where I live now, would probably not think of having a special September 16th service to celebrate Mexican Independence Day — even though many aliens and immigrants are a part of our number.)

Instead, we can take a day to focus on and celebrate the Lordship of Christ, which He exercises through all nations, including our own.

– EO

These thoughts are influenced by Martin Luther’s theology of the two realms/kingdoms, and by a desire to see these ideas once again fleshed out in the life of local churches, particularly Lutheran churches.

 

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Channeling Your Inner Herodian

From Eugene Peterson’s The Jesus Way (2007). Sound like anyone you know today?

judeagreat“I would have been impressed with Herod [the Great] if I had lived in the first century. Herod was the biggest name in Palestine. He was the richest man in the world. He employed more people than anyone in the country. You couldn’t walk out of your house without hearing the name Herod. You couldn’t walk down any road without coming on one of his massive building operations. Herod, Herod, Herod.

“It is impossible, at least for me, not to be impressed with Herod … Politically he was able to manipulate power-hungry Rome … He was not a religious man, but he turned out to be a relentlessly aggressive propagandist…, using it as a means to political power … His building projects were absolutely stunning.

“Herod had done the ‘kingdom’ thing magnificently: his skilled brokering of power, his use of Greek theater and athletic contests to shape people’s thinking and values, his architectural splendor giving everyone a sense that their king was all-powerful and majestic. He had gathered a very diverse population of Jews and Romans, pagans and Greeks, feuding sects and uncongenial political parties, and hammered out a kind of working unity among them … Herod was not interested in God, but everything else was intact.”

Herod. Making Judea Great Again.

herodiansEven in the days of the Herods, the faith community was divided over their feelings about the powerful political family. One group was known as the Herodians, a small clique of avowed partisans of the Herodian dynasty. As godless, manipulative and culturally polluted as the Herods were, Herodians still saw this brand of rule as necessary for the prosperity of the region.

The Pharisees did not see it this way. They thought it spiritual compromise to advocate for the Herods.

Interesting … Pharisees and Herodians have two things in common, and one huge difference. In common: They both attacked Jesus, and tried to bring him down. And Jesus never directly addressed their politics. The difference: Jesus had far more negative things to say to the Pharisees than the Herodians.

What about you? Are you inclined to unite yourself to a political entity, as troubling as it may be, because it beats the alternative? Or do you find such an alliance as a compromise to your spiritual convictions? Any chance you would have a HEROD NOW sign in your front yard, or sticker on your car?

It’s an historical maxim that bad leaders only get worse with age. Take Herod the Great:

“During the last years of his life his proclivities to cruelty accelerated. He became a virtual monster, hated by everyone, massacring at whim. The famous quip from Caesar Augustus back in Rome, a close personal friend of Herod’s, would have served as an apt epitaph over his grave: ‘I would rather be Herod’s pig than his son.'”

As Peterson points out, “Jesus lived as if Herod had never existed. Jesus ignored the world of power and accomplishment that was brilliantly on display all around him. He chose to work on the margins of society, with unimportant people, giving particular attention to the weak, the disturbed, the powerless.”

– EO

 

 
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Posted by on October 4, 2016 in 21st Century, Politics

 

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Good Mourning, Lord.

“They laughed at him, knowing that she was dead.”

In Luke 8, we read the story of Jesus raising a dead girl to life. Because she was dead, her home was surrounded by mourners – professional mourners, doing their culturally-dictated job of weeping and wailing in a public fashion to give a corporate voice to the community’s sadness.

But their hypocrisy was uncovered when Jesus said, “She is not dead, but asleep.” How quickly these veneer-thick mourners went from lament to laughter.Their mourning, perhaps conceived with good intentions, was pretense, not pity.

imageYesterday, a shooting rampage in a gay Florida night club left over 50 people dead … in the name of the attackers’ version of their Islamic faith. For the past 24 hours, I have watched and read the litany of mournful statements and posts. We are all incredibly sad that such a thing could happen right here, on American soil. I know the sorrow is very real for some (though I suspect that some of the “mourning” has been a veiled attempt at theo-political correctness – some pretense rather than pity).

But, it got me to thinking. In Christ, there is “neither Jew nor Greek”. As a follower of Jesus, I am an alien and stranger here on earth. I know many from the U.S. will balk at this, but I’m convinced that I should be WAY more committed to the Kingdom of God than the country of my geography and ethnicity. And my heart should bleed as much for the nations as for any isolated locale. I don’t at all begrudge people for mourning the Orlando shootings. But I don’t think Jesus is sadder about our national tragedy than He is about similar things happening all over the world. If we truly have a heart like the Savior’s … then why don’t we mourn for the nations?

iraqIt got me to thinking, which got me to doing a bit of searching … and I’m afraid I ran into some extraordinarily depressing news. Do you realize how many tragedies like the Orlando shooting have happened in 2016 alone? Over 130! … I’ve made a list of terrorist acts with double-digit death counts (there are more than twice as many of these where less than 10 were killed). I’ve posted them below … and I offer these thoughts:

  1. I think the Homeland Security leadership has done an admirable job in this country – that we don’t show up on this list until June 11. This is especially true considering how much we are loathed by the most violent of terrorist groups.
  2. Do we look at the numbers next to countries like Iraq and Afghanistan, and figure that, well, that’s just part and parcel of the situation, and is to be expected? Or do we mourn for those losses as well?
  3. Why do we pray so little? These attacks show no sign of stopping. I think we all know that prayer matters, makes a difference, etc. In light of the incredibly awful situation we find ourselves in these days, how can we ever get through a day without crying out to God for His mercy?(My biggest question.)
  4. How do we mourn for all of these people? So much unspeakable tragedy … so much anguish. Is it easier to just rent a movie and numb our minds to these realities? Or do we believe Jesus enough to emotionally and prayerfully enter into the brokenness, and help carry these international burdens?

 

“It is better to go to a house of mourning than to go to a house of feasting, for death is the destiny of everyone; the living should take this to heart” (Eccl. 7:2). Lord, teach us to love our neighbors, and mourn with those who mourn. Really.

– EO

3-Jan Iraq 15
7-Jan Libya 60
1-Jan Iraq 12
11-Jan Iraq 20
11-Jan Iraq 100
12-Jan Turkey 12
13-Jan Pakistan 15
13-Jan Cameroon 12
15-Jan Somalia 63
16-Jan Burkina Faso 30
16-Jan Syria 300
17-Jan Afghanistan 14
17-Jan Yemen 10
19-Jan Pakistan 10
20-Jan Pakistan 20
22-Jan Somalia 20
25-Jan Scameroon 28
25-Jan Syria 23
26-Jan Syria 29
26-Jan Afghanistan 10
27-Jan Iraq 55
30-Jan Nigeria 86
1-Feb Afghanistan 20
3-Feb Syria 15
8-Feb Iraq 300
9-Feb Nigeria 60
13-Feb Nigeria 22
17-Feb Yemen 13
17-Feb Turkey 28
19-Feb Cameroon 24
21-Feb Syria 57
21-Feb Syria 134
22-Feb Afghanistan 14
25-Feb Iraq 15
26-Feb Somalia 14
27-Feb Afghanistan 13
28-Feb Iraq 78
28-Feb Somaila 30
29-Feb Iraq 40
29-Feb DRC 13
2-Mar Syria 18
4-Mar Yemen 15
6-Mar Iraq 61
6-Mar Syria 14
7-Mar Pakistan 10
7-Mar Tunisia 17
13-Mar Ivory Coast 19
13-Mar Turkey 37
16-Mar Pakistan 15
16-Mar Nigeria 22
18-Mar Syria 11
19-Mar Egypt 13
20-Mar Iraq 24
22-Mar Belgium 32
25-Mar Iraq 41
25-Mar Yemen 26
26-Mar Iraq 18
27-Mar Pakistan 72
4-Apr Iraq 14
7-Apr Syria 23
8-Apr Syria 175
9-Apr Yemen 17
9-Apr Philippines 18
11-Apr Afghanistan 12
19-Apr Afghanistan 64
21-Apr Iraq 250
23-Apr Iraq 45
24-Apr Nigeria 30
25-Apr Syria 16
29-Apr Iraq 14
30-Apr Iraq 38
1-May Somaila 22
1-May Iraq 33
2-May Iraq 18
2-May Iraq 17
3-May DRC 38
4-May Syria 15
5-May Syria 12
5-May Iraq 25
9-May Iraq 16
10-May Afghanistan 11
11-May Iraq 17
11-May Iraq 64
11-May Iraq 13
11-May Yemen 13
11-May Syria 45
12-May Yemen 15
12-May Syria 49
13-May Iraq 16
13-May Iraq 11
14-May Syria 20
15-May Iraq 14
15-May Iraq 15
15-May Yemen 47
16-May Iraq 21
17-May Iraq 101
18-May Iraq 25
20-May Afghanistan 11
22-May Syria 12
23-May Yemen 45
23-May Syria 184
25-May Afghanistan 11
29-May Iraq 25
29-May Iraq 12
31-May Afghanistan 17
1-Jun Somalia 16
1-Jun Iraq 13
3-Jun Yemen 18
3-Jun Iraq 18
4-Jun Syria 40
4-Jun Nigeria 32
6-Jun Kazakhstan 10
5-Jun Syria 38
5-Jun Iraq 13
5-Jun Iraq 400
6-Jun Iraq 11
7-Jun Iraq 65
7-Jun Turkey 11
7-Jun Iraq 10
7-Jun Syria 20
8-Jun Afghanistan 16
9-Jun Iraq 12
9-Jun Iraq 12
9-Jun Iraq 19
9-Jun Syria 54
10-Jun Libya 32
10-Jun Iraq 30
11-Jun Iraq 10
11-Jun Afghanistan 14
11-Jun Syria 20
11-Jun Syria 49
12-Jun USA 50
 

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