RSS

Tag Archives: contemporary

God, Do You Hate Our Worship?

Read Amos 5:21-27

I have been a pastor for worship for several churches in my career. One thing that has always been true: When it comes to high holy days, we ramp up the arts. It seems obvious that the major festivals – especially Christmas and Easter – deserve our best, artistic offerings of worship. It’s as though we want to give God the biggest possible “thank you” for His actions connected to these important days. (Either that, or we want to impress and entice unbelievers.)

Today’s passage in Amos 5 makes me wonder if we’re really on the right track, especially during Advent.

Israel’s religion was strong. The faith-centers were well funded. The music being made was probably at a never-before experienced cultural apex.  Hey, if God is prospering us, attendance is great, and our arts expressions are excellent, surely God must be pleased, right?

A paraphrase of v.21-23 for our modern day has God saying through Amos … “I hate your big productions, as well as your pensive, ‘worshipful’ services. You’re taking big offerings, but they’re not for me, and I don’t want them. I choose to not even take notice. I prefer silence to your worship music, and I’m ignoring your massive bands and sound systems.” Is there any chance God feels this way about today’s contemporary, megachurch worship? Especially during the holidays, when so many of the people singing along don’t even believe?

But why, exactly, was God so against these services? Because the people were practicing injustice and unrighteousness (v.24). The familiar theme of Amos is repeated: The economics of the rich were oppressing the poor. In addition, their worship practices were filled with unholy influences. Sakkuth, Kaiwan, some images … very trendy, very inclusive, very fashion-forward, very worldly … and very much detested by the LORD. The next stop for these worshipers? Forced exile.

The heart of Advent is that we would prepare our hearts from the coming of Christ. If these Israelites had prepared themselves in light of Amos’ prophecies, they would have jettisoned their corrupted worship practices, and focused their attention on generously loving their neighbor as themselves. We ought to do the same thing. But it’s hard to focus on this kind of self-assessment and repentance when we crank up the Christmas music, go to special performances, gorge ourselves at parties and feasts, and spend hours in the temples built to the god Mammon (the malls).

My takeaway today? I need some silence this season. Time to truly consider the LORD, the call of His Word, and the needed preparations for His arrival. As the carol declares, “He makes the nations prove the glories of righteousness.” Before He does that by means of the nations, may He do that, by His Spirit, through His holy nation, the people of God. Might His righteousness roll like an ever-flowing stream from the lives of His church.

Then our songs shall truly be heard by the only audience that matters.

– EO

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 13, 2015 in Advent 2015, Amos, Worship

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Our Love-Hate Relationship With Our Family Prophets

Stoning

The Apostle Paul said, “Follow the way of love and eagerly desire gifts of the Spirit, especially prophecy…the one who prophesies speaks to people for their strengthening, encouraging and comfort.” Then again, Jesus said, “A prophet is not without honor except in his own town, among his relatives and in his own home.” 

Is it appropriate to make this correlation: That prophetic words…

a) are the most important gifts for the church,

b) are intended to take people from where they are to where they could be (e.g., change their lives), and

c) will be rejected by the family they intend to serve?

As I go spelunking into the caverns of church history, I have begun to notice an all-too-common theme. There are many men and women who seem to have had uniquely clear vision in their day to see their condition, and a path to its improvement. With 20-20 historical hindsight, we honor these people. But most, in their day, faced stern resistance, rejection, and even extermination.

The sad thing? So many of these simply wanted the best for the church. They died for having a grander vision of what the church family could be than the rest of them could see.

Luther preachingI’ve come to find out in my short time here on the planet this less-than-profound truth: People want to enjoy themselves. That goes for my church family, too. In our age and place, with so many church options to choose from, most will pick a place that they likeOf course. Why would you pick a place you don’t like?

The church, though, is not designed to cater to our wants. It is, by definition, a place of discipleship, therefore discipline. As the author of Hebrews says, “Endure hardship as discipline; God is treating you as his children. For what children are not disciplined by their father? If you are not disciplined—and everyone undergoes discipline—then you are not legitimate, not true sons and daughters at all … God disciplines us for our good, in order that we may share in his holiness. No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it” (Hebrews 12:7-8, 10-11). When Jesus commanded the Apostles to make “disciples” of all nations (Matthew 28:19), he was charging them baptize people into communities of discipline all over the world. Melding these passages together, Jesus was calling these men to broadcast a call to a life of painful hardship that will train you to become righteous, holy, peaceful and good. Anything less is illegitimate.

Prophets – those gifted by God to see truth, and boldly proclaim it in the church family – are on the front lines of this disciplined life. Like that really hard teacher in high school, or the over-the-top aerobics instructor, or that drill sergeant from your military days, the prophet is the one who calls you out of your present, and into your future. As the contemporary adage says, “No pain, no gain.” When we look back on these disciplinarians, some – especially those who rejected their leadership – might see them as obnoxious. But many of us are now grateful for the vision that they had for our lives, and their persistent drive to see us change. Those who endured bear the fruit, and are thankful.

Cranmer

Despite this whatever belated appreciation we can muster, it is a spiritual axiom that those with prophetic giftings will face rejection from the very family they are trying to serve. They are also indispensable to the life of the family. Paul tells us be especially ardent in seeking this gift … but really, who wants it?

Most all of our most famous aunts and uncles of the faith faced bitter rejection at the hands of the churches they served. Like their leader, they also become “the stone the builders rejected.” Paul. Athanasius. Benedict. Wycliffe. Hus. More. Luther. Hubmaier. Cranmer. Edwards. And a cavalcade of saints in local churches from our modern world. We may not say it … we may not even realize it! … but we’re eternally thankful for your faithfulness.

-eo

 

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 5, 2013 in church, leadership, Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

21st Century Family – “Winning at Life”

So, I got an invitation to church in the mail today.

On the front, it says, “Coming Soon! To the East Valley. Join us…for the launch of the East Valley Campus.”

On the back, it says, “Helping you WIN AT LIFE – Join us for our Grand Opening experience as we kickoff a brand new four-week series called My Family.”

winner

That, along with logos and web site addresses, is my invitation.

Jesus?

Church?

The Cross?

One thing one notices when exploring our family through history is that every generation sees the Biblical truths of Jesus morphed by the influences of the culture. In the ancient church, the theology was bloody. During the last days of the Empire, it was Imperial. The Middle Ages found us nervous and desperate. The Reformation made us bookish. The Enlightenment made us proud of our ideas. The Industrial Revolution made us machine-like. The days of the revivals have made us crowd loving emotionalists, and the post-war era urged us to be somewhat complacent.

Well, our modern era would have our faith become something that helps us “Win at Life.” That makes sense. It fits in with all of our triggers. From the time I entered kindergarten, I was on a path toward self-fulfillment — through education (“space technology, working for me!”), our world was progressing, and all I had to do was get on board, and enjoy the American Dream. The land of opportunity has provided all the means by which I can be “a winner!”  My job. My family. My home. My toys. My retirement. My “good life.”

So, it only makes sense that the church of today should morph to serve these ideals. After all, I do want to win. I don’t want to be a loser. I want to be first, not last. I want servants, not to serve. I want contentment, not a cross of suffering. The right kind of gospel for this generation is a Jesus who died, so I won’t have to. Instead of dying to self, I get to win.

I have no doubt that the new church will do very well numerically, and in terms of gathering a slough of enthusiastic customers.

I wish them the best. Not success, but the best. Maybe a return to the best. Loss.

I consider everything a loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things. I consider them garbage, that I may gain Christ, and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which is through faith in Christ—the righteousness that comes from God on the basis of faith. I want to know Christ—yes, to know the power of his resurrection and participation in his sufferings, becoming like him in his death, and so, somehow, attaining to the resurrection from the dead.” – Philippians 3:8-11

 
1 Comment

Posted by on September 6, 2013 in Contemporary Experiences

 

Tags: , ,